Mark: The Beginning Again

It is a pretty well accepted fact among scholars that Mark’s original gospel ended at verse 16:8.  Verses 9-20 were added quite a bit later, possibly in an attempt to harmonize it with the other gospel stories.  Or perhaps the original ending did not test well with focus groups.  Some find it to be a bit of a downer, full …

Mark: The End (Program and Sermon)

Program Sermon Outline (loosely followed) I.        Transfiguration a.       Elijah, Moses, Jesus b.      Making tents c.       Beloved Son II.     The Way to Jerusalem a.       Argument of James and John b.      Bartimaeus III.   Jerusalem a.       Triumphal Entry b.      Curse of the fig tree c.       Cleansing the temple d.      Teaching e.       Anointing at Bethany f.        Passover g.       Betrayal h.       Arrest i.         Trial j.        …

Mark: The End

We know how this ends, right?  After an auspicious beginning, Jesus travels to Jerusalem, stirs up trouble, gets arrested, and is crucified.  And for those of us who grew up in the church, we probably know the meaning of this as well.  Allowing some variation in the way it is formulated, the bottom line is that Jesus’ death is our …

Mark: The Ministry of Mystery

(I somehow forgot to post this last week, so I’m just catching up.  Sorry. – Scott) Last week, we began at the beginning.  The Gospel of Mark begins with an enigma, proclaiming to readers “the beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, Son of God,” a story that they are presumed to already know.  To us, much of it …

Mark: The Ministry of Mystery (Program and Sermon)

Program Sermon Outline (loosely followed) I.        Who is Jesus? a.       Son of God Used in opening and not again until the crucifixion. b.      Son of Man Jesus’ preferred way of referring to himself in Mark.  “Son of man” initially just means “human” in the Hebrew Bible, but becomes the title of an eschatological judge in Daniel.  This develops into the …

Mark: The Beginning (Program and Sermon Outline

Program Sermon Outline (loosely followed) I.        Background a.       Author 1.      Traditionally Mark, associated with Peter 2.      Unknown b.      Occasion 1.      Fall of Temple 2.      Sack of Jerusalem 3.      Resolving relationship to two communities a)      Jews (1)   Rejection by priests and scribes (2)   New temple b)      Rome c.       Community 1.      Greek speaking 2.      Gentile 3.      Persecuted d.      Style 1.      Crude 2.      …

Mark: The Beginning

For churches that follow the lectionary, this is the year of Mark.  The lectionary years are designated A, B, and C, which correspond to following the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, respectively.  So this is Year B, the year to read Mark.  The purpose of the lectionary is to give people a complete view of the Bible every three …

How to Read the Bible (Program and Sermon)

Program Sermon Outline (loosely followed) I.        Introduction a.       Review 1.      Literal 2.      Allegorical 3.      Moral 4.      Anagogical b.      Read out loud 1.      Jonah 2.      God 3.      Captain 4.      Sailors 5.      Narrator 6.      Newsreader for the King of Ninevah II.     Literal a.       What does it say? b.      What doesn’t it say? c.       What voices are left out? d.      Who wins and …

How to Read the Bible: The Reading

And finally we get to try out our new toys.  We’ve spent the past few weeks talking about the classic understanding of the four senses of Scripture: literal, allegorical, moral, and anagogical.  We have explored the promise and the peril of each and looked at some new reading strategies that might open up the text, find the life that beckons …